Archive for August, 2018

Two health tips that are fast, effective and FREE

Anyone can afford these two suggestions and the benefits are unbelievably good!

  • Drink more water. I was reminded of this one during my work out today. I just didn’t have my usual energy and I’d had enough sleep. Then I realized that I didn’t finish my allotment of water yesterday and was off to a slow start on water today. Even mild dehydration can lead to headaches, fatigue and muscle cramps. Water is also needed for the body to run its detox processes and most everything else. Shortchange yourself on water and risk constipation, insomnia and much more. The common guideline is to drink as many ounces per day as ½ your body weighs in pounds. E.g. 180-lb person would drink 90 ounces of water. I fill a big glass bottle in the morning and usually finish it all by the end of the day. On those days I feel better and eat less. Naysayers may tell you to only drink when you are thirsty. However, by the time that happens, you are already too low. Also, some people interpret the signals as hunger. Obviously, clean filtered water is best and we should avoid the hormone disrupting plasticizers in plastic bottles.
  • Eat less sugar. Now, them’s fightin’ words…because it is hard…at least at first. Maybe this new information will motivate you…“Adding less than three teaspoons of sugar to your tea every day increases your risk of Alzheimer’s disease [54%], new research suggests.” Why did the author mention “tea”? Probably because the article was in a British source, The Daily Mail. You’ve heard no doubt that excess sugar also leads to diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Author Nancy Appleton, PhD lists 144 Reasons Sugar Ruins Your Health. (New research has added many to that list since she was on our radio show the first time.) Maybe we can be strong in the face of baked goods and turn down sodas which are the worst. Sadly, what makes sugar so hard to avoid is that you don’t always see it coming. Sugar is hiding in salad dressings, frozen entrees, pasta sauces, yogurt, instant oatmeal, some processed meats, soups and…well almost every manufactured “food”. My friend, celebrity physician, Fred Pescatore, MD, likes to point out that there is more sugar in ketchup than ice cream. (By the way, that is not advice to eat ice cream.) It is imperative to read labels because that is how you know! The good news is that if you can be strong for a even few days to a week, you will feel a whole lot better and not crave sweets like you might have in the past.

These two positive changes go hand in hand. Drink more water and you will eat less sugar. Eat less junk and water will taste better.

The BIG story in the TINY print on vitamin labels

In last week’s blog, I discussed the critical need for vitamin D for immune function, maintaining normal weight and lung function, avoiding mood problems, and preventing both diabetes and dental cavities in children as well as adults.

Zinc is key to most aspects of health but too often overlooked

  • Parents who want to keep their child from getting whatever is going around (surely, they all do) may think of Vitamin C. That is good, but as noted last week, vitamin D might be even more critical. So is the mineral zinc. Zinc not only aids our immune systems, it makes vaccines work better. Hundreds of enzymes in the body use zinc for crucial functions like building the brain and maintaining normal function of the nervous system. This linked study associated dyslexia with a shortage of zinc. This linked Bill Sardi article shows that zinc helps with ADD/ADHD. Zinc is needed for the normal growth of muscles and clear skin. (Teens often need more zinc.)
  • The safety range of doses for minerals is less flexible than that for vitamins. The recommended levels of zinc range from 3 mg for a 1-year-old to 8 mg for a 13-year-old. The richest food sources of zinc (like oysters and crab) are not popular with kids, but breakfast cereals are fortified with zinc, even if it is in an inferior form. Vegetarians eat a lot of foods (like beans) that bind up zinc making it unusable. And so, they may need more zinc.
  • Popular children’s multivitamin/mineral pills use sugar, artificial colors and cartoon characters to distract from their inferior ingredients. Flintstones is typical in that it uses zinc oxide which is difficult to absorb and utilize. The product also suffers by inclusion of sugar, cornstarch, and aspartame (a.k.a. Nutrasweet, the scary chemical sweetener). The parents that made this brand a top-seller must not be reading the fine print where they would also find several artificial colors that are linked to behavior problems. Note that those colors also contain aluminum which is increasingly showing up as a toxic overload in testing. The quote in this week’s newsletter is from musician, Pete Seeger: “Education is when you read the fine print. Experience [often a bad one ] is what you get if you don’t.”
  • As a big fan of Bill Sardi’s Molecular Multi for adults, I was relieved that he formulated a multiple for kids, “First in Class”. As expected, it has the nutrients children need and in the right doses and forms that are best utilized. Of course, it is free of the artificial junk mentioned above. What wouldn’t have been expected is that it also contains nutrients (vitamins A, vitamin D and IP6 a factor in bran) that have been found lacking in children who develop peanut allergy. The capsules are tiny and easy to swallow. Although many kids can swallow a hamburger in 3 bites, some resist taking a capsule. If so, the contents can be mixed into food. Fortunately, his priceless product is very affordable—as low as twenty cents a day when you buy three bottles. LINK.

Teachers really appreciate well-nourished students because those kids behave and learn better.

As a big fan of Bill Sardi’s Molecular Multi for adults, I was relieved that he formulated a multiple for kids, “First in Class”. As expected, it has the nutrients children need and in the right doses and forms that are best utilized. Of course, it is free of the artificial junk mentioned above. What wouldn’t have been expected is that it also contains nutrients (vitamins A, vitamin D and IP6 a factor in bran) that have been found lacking in children who develop peanut allergy. The capsules are tiny and easy to swallow. Although many kids can swallow a hamburger in 3 bites, some resist taking a capsule. If so, the contents can be mixed into food. Fortunately, his priceless product is very affordable—as low as twenty cents a day when you buy three bottles. LINK.

Teachers will really appreciate well-nourished students because they behave and learn better.

* Our sponsor MindWrks Wellness has had great positive responses with ADD/ADHD using their non-drug microcurrent neurofeedback treatments.

D is for “darned well better have enough”

Parents of young children may not be a high percentage of Healthy by Nature radio listeners or readers of this newsletter. However, I’ll bet most have family and friends whom they can bless with helpful information about children.

This week I was interviewed by Mike Triem of KLTT radio in Colorado about preparing kids nutritionally for going back to school. (That short interview will air Friday, Aug 10th, 2018 at 4:45 & 10:45pm on KLTT.) The conversation got me to thinking.

Vitamin D came to mind first.

  • Of course, vitamin D is critical for developing strong bones. But, it is also necessary for building a vigorous immune system. (It seems highly likely that the diminished sunshine in winter is a key factor in the colds and flu having a “season”.) D is also important for maintaining normal weight and lung function, avoiding mood problems, and preventing both diabetes and dental cavities. Children with ADD/ADHD typically have low levels of vitamin D. A small but remarkable study shows that high doses of vitamin D markedly reduced the symptoms of autism in ¾ of the subjects! Blood levels of 40-100 were needed for the positive effect.
  • Nature’s original plan was for kids to make vitamin D when sun contacts their skin. A recent study in England showed that the average child spends just 7 hours a week outdoors and that 40% of parents must force their video-gamer children to leave the house. I doubt it is much different in the US. When kids do go outdoors, careful parents slather them with sunscreen that blocks vitamin D formation.

Foods basically do not provide vitamin D. Milk is usually fortified with small amounts of vitamin D2. That form is only about ½ as useful as the vitamin D3 in supplements. And, what about kids that do not tolerate milk? Dark skin is a natural sun block, so it is more difficult for them to achieve adequate blood levels of D.

  • Government supplement guidelines limit vitamin D for kids to 400-600 IU a day. That amount may be enough to avoid the deficiency disease, Rickets. A much greater amount would be needed to achieve the other benefits mentioned in the first bullet point. This journal article recommends as much as 3,000 IU/a day for children. It makes sense that they can handle more when you consider that the side effect of excess vitamin D (exceeding rare) is too much calcium. Kid’s bones are growing fast and using up calcium at a high rate. Note, the mineral magnesium is required for the proper utilization of vitamin D.

Next week, I will continue this discussion about sending kids back to school with a better chance for health and success with another nutrient.

 


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